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TOKYO GAME SHOW 2006

Vol.2 - Page 1

Just like last year round this time, I went to see the Tokyo Game Show 2006 (TGS2006) this past Sunday. The numerous events in the past years have gotten me accustomed to the trip to the site: after the long way to Tokyo Station, I hopped on the Keikyu Line that takes me all the way to Makuhari.

 
Unlike last time, I went there as press, not a regular visitor. I didn’t have to bother getting in line to get the tickets and I smoothly passed through the press reception feeling a tad bit of superiority. This sense of superiority, though at the same time, made me feel responsibility of being part of the press to report the show to those who couldn’t get the chance to go.
 

My honest impression of going in from the press reception desk was that I felt the place to be wider. It felt like there was a lot of room. Certainly there were a lot of people – the number of visitors are said to be the biggest since it has started – but it looked as though the number of booths have decreased as compared to last year.

Before I go into the details, let me just notify the readers that I do not intend to show any data or give numbers here on this report: it will be of my pure impression and comments, hence, subjective. If you are looking for data report, I bet you can find a bunch of them somewhere else on the Internet. Here, I am only going to write about what or how I honestly felt going to TGS2006.

So, the show: the first hall that I went into contained booths of major game makers such as SEGA, KONAMI, SQUARE ENIX, CAPCOM, SONY and BANDAI NAMCO, and they each took up a lot of space inside the hall. This was probably part of why I felt like there weren’t as many booths and companies exhibiting this year.

This impression didn’t change much when I moved into another hall right next to it. Enterprises here included major ones as well like Microsoft, SNK, KOEI, and TAKARA TOMY joined in by pavilions of non-Japanese makers and development tools. They were all gathered in one corner, so as a whole it still looked like big chunks of booths taking up large spaces respectively.

 
 

Last year and the year before, I clearly remember many small companies boasting their newest products, setting up booths on the smallest piece of floor they could find in the hall. This year, the number of exhibitors were apparently small, and I got the impression that the well-known famous ones were sort of dominating the hall.

Hmm, I could tell that there were more people, but having heard the news that the E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo: a computer game expo held in USA) is going to scale down from next year, I was wondering if the same was to happen or happening with TGS. But as I walked around I started to develop this peculiar feeling here and there like, “Hey I though this game soft was out from a different company.” Gradually I came to realize what the big difference this year is, and the answer became clear when I saw the SEGA booth.

 
 
Special Contents
Tokyo Game Show
First part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Latter part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Tokyo Mortor Show
    First part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Novelette
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Latter part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Mt.FUJI
    Mt. Fuji special edition
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • Grand Sumo (ozumo)
    First visit to the Grand Sumo Tournament

    First part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Novelette
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Latter part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4

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