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TOKYO GAME SHOW 2006

Vol.3 - Page 1

I have written in the past two volumes four pages about the atmosphere and the tendency of Tokyo Game Show 2006, and I think it’s about time I conclude it – not to mention nearly a month has passed since its holding.

First of all, here is my personal and honest conclusion of TGS2006. I know I have mentioned this already in the earlier part of this article, but just to repeat it as part of the conclusion I felt that the show generally lacked enthusiasm. It was kind of quiet. Or perhaps, I might have felt so because there weren’t as many booths and games that presented eccentricity like the kind you feel an electric shock inside you. A lot of the displays were rather straightforward to the point it was too straight, so that may be why no particular one left a great impact in me when I left.

 
Even then, I do feel like the first display of the playable PS3 was gathering the biggest attention of all. The hardware alone is an adventure, if I were to share my own opinion, and for SONY and the developers who want to make a good firm start with it can’t go too adventurous with their first PS3 launch softwares because those must sell well and a little thrill can be a huge risk to take.
 

In addition, displaying playable models required a lot of space and I suppose that the fact they had quite a number of playables out with different softwares forced them into making the booth rather simple and solid.
Their rival company Microsoft looked like they’re going to throw in loads of new softwares to join the Christmas shopping war and for this reason had a similar booth to SONY with a lot of demo-playables.

On the other hand, I would also like to note that it could have turned out to be a wonderful show for the game-lovers in a way. Magazines and press specializing on video games could probably get a lot of detailed information on games to enrich their articles with good photos, too. In that sense, I think the show was made into a good, proper game show with the right goal.

The other thing that left a strong impression on me was the number of computer games to be played on computers (of course). Anyone who had been to the show in the previous years could see the difference. Most of them were basically online games. I know quite a bit of games but there were many moments that made me wonder, “Hey this one’s new. Which hard is this played on?” and turned out to be computer gamesofts. I hear that in Asia especially China and Korea online games are a craze, crazy enough to kill people (a few “fatalities” have been reported from online gaming), and it seems like the wave is finally rippling across Japan.

 
 

As for the styles as in shapes of the booths, many of them were enclosed and limited the number of people who could go in at a time. Some were built that way to avoid release / copyright issues that can come from violation of photography rights, but it seemed like a lot of them did so because their games were R-rated including overly violent, sexual or shocking scenes. The variety of games made and promoted at cons like this has really widened.

 
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Special Contents
Tokyo Game Show
First part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Latter part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Tokyo Motor Show
    First part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Novelette
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Latter part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Mt.FUJI
    Mt. Fuji special edition
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • Grand Sumo (ozumo)
    First visit to the Grand Sumo Tournament

    First part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Novelette
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4
  • Latter part
  • vol.1
  • vol.2
  • vol.3
  • vol.4

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